In DepthHIGH-PRESSURE PHYSICS

At last, room temperature superconductivity achieved

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Science  16 Oct 2020:
Vol. 370, Issue 6514, pp. 273-274
DOI: 10.1126/science.370.6514.273

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Summary

Fulfilling a decades-old quest, this week researchers report creating the first superconductor that does not have to be cooled for its electrical resistance to vanish. There's a catch: The new room temperature superconductor only works at a pressure equivalent to about three-quarters of that at the center of Earth. To achieve that pressure, the material—a mix of hydrogen, sulfur, and carbon—was crushed between the flat tops of two diamonds. Now, if researchers can stabilize the material at ambient pressure, dreamed-of applications of superconductivity could be within reach, such as low-loss power lines and ultrapowerful superconducting magnets that don't need refrigeration, for MRI machines and maglev trains.

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