Books et al.History of Science

Experiments in creativity

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Science  16 Oct 2020:
Vol. 370, Issue 6514, pp. 301
DOI: 10.1126/science.abe4099

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Summary

The acronym "STEAM," which stands for science, technology, engineering, art, and math, came into popularity in 2011, as scientists and educators pondered the question of how to get more students interested in pursuing careers in science. Part of the answer, they reasoned, would be to make science courses more holistic by incorporating the arts—but how might this be done? For inspiration, they need only have looked to the 1960s, when a cadre of artists and engineers worked together to create media that would blur the lines between individuals, art, and technology. That historic movement is the subject of W. Patrick McCray's excellent new book, Making Art Work, which provides a comprehensive history of postwar artistic and scientific collaborations in the United States.

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