Research Article

The nucleus acts as a ruler tailoring cell responses to spatial constraints

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Science  16 Oct 2020:
Vol. 370, Issue 6514, eaba2894
DOI: 10.1126/science.aba2894

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The nucleus makes the rules

Single cells continuously experience and react to mechanical challenges in three-dimensional tissues. Spatial constraints in dense tissues, physical activity, and injury all impose changes in cell shape. How cells can measure shape deformations to ensure correct tissue development and homeostasis remains largely unknown (see the Perspective by Shen and Niethammer). Working independently, Venturini et al. and Lomakin et al. now show that the nucleus can act as an intracellular ruler to measure cellular shape variations. The nuclear envelope provides a gauge of cell deformation and activates a mechanotransduction pathway that controls actomyosin contractility and migration plasticity. The cell nucleus thereby allows cells to adapt their behavior to the local tissue microenvironment.

Science, this issue p. eaba2644, p. eaba2894; see also p. 295

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