In DepthU.S. Government

Science could benefit as Democrats take power

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Science  15 Jan 2021:
Vol. 371, Issue 6526, pp. 218-219
DOI: 10.1126/science.371.6526.218

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Summary

Science advocates are hoping the new Democratic majority in both houses of Congress will team up with President-elect Joe Biden "to move forward in ways that are transformational and not incremental." The narrow edge in the Senate will make it easier for Biden to win confirmation of his appointees and for Congress to revoke controversial rules finalized in the final 5 months of President Donald Trump's administration. It could also help Democrats enact promised legislation aimed at curbing climate change and boosting federal investments in research, infrastructure, and public health. But a narrowly divided and highly polarized Congress will likely constrain efforts to realize the most ambitious proposals put forward by policymakers and advocacy groups. And Democrats could have as little as 2 years to exercise their expanded powers if the midterm elections in November 2022 gives Republicans a chance to regain one or two bodies.

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