Aging

Live fast, die young

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Science  28 May 2021:
Vol. 372, Issue 6545, pp. 930-931
DOI: 10.1126/science.372.6545.930-f

Aging sees many physiological changes. Studies are revealing the dynamics of the cells and molecular factors that contribute to the aging process. For example, chronological age can be estimated by comparing DNA methylation status. Anderson et al. measured DNA methylation in the baboons of Kenya's Amboseli National Park to find out whether epigenetic changes associated with aging are affected by an animal's social environment in the wild. Early adversity and social bonds did not apparently affect the epigenetic clock, but there was a signal from male social status and competitiveness. By measuring the accumulation of epigenetic markers, high-ranking dominant males appeared older than their chronological ages.

eLife 10, e66128 (2021).

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