PerspectiveNeuroscience

Expanding gliogenesis

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Science  11 Jun 2021:
Vol. 372, Issue 6547, pp. 1151-1152
DOI: 10.1126/science.abj1139

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Summary

The adult mammalian brain retains the capacity to generate new neurons and glia, a feature that is important for learning, memory, and response to injury (1). Neural stem cells (NSCs) in germinal regions of the adult brain, such as the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, are a major source of new neurons and glia (1). Glia, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells, and microglia, are non-neuronal cells that play critical roles in brain function. Although the neurogenic functions of stem cells in the adult V-SVZ have been studied extensively, their gliogenic properties are less well understood. On page 1205 of this issue, Delgado et al. (2) reveal previously undescribed gliogenic origins and glial cell types in the adult mouse brain. This discovery suggests that adult gliogenesis is more widespread than previously thought, laying the groundwork for potential regenerative therapies.

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