Abstract
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Arabidopsis Transcription Factors: Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis Among Eukaryotes
J. L. Riechmann, J. Heard, G. Martin, L. Reuber, C. -Z., Jiang, J. Keddie, L. Adam, O. Pineda, O. J. Ratcliffe, R. R. Samaha, R. Creelman, M. Pilgrim, P. Broun, J. Z. Zhang, D. Ghandehari, B. K. Sherman, and G. -L. Yu

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Phylogenetic relationships and possible divergence times of plant, fungus, and animal lineages


according to molecular time estimates (L. Savard et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 5163 (1994); D. Y.-C. Wang, S. Kumar, S. B. Hedges, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 266, 163 (1999)). Time estimates for the three-way split of plants, animals, and fungi, and for the animal phyla are from Wang et al., 1999. An alternative phylogenetic relationship among nematodes, arthropods, and vertebrates has been proposed in other molecular studies (K. Bremer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 4707 (2000)). Estimates for the plant lineage are from Savard et al., 1994. Although the three-way split is drawn as unresolved, other studies have shown that animals and fungi are more related to each other than they are to plants, which constitute an independent evolutionary lineage (S. L. Baldauf, J. D. Palmer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 11558 (1993)). Discrepancies between the fossil record and the molecular time estimates for the monocot-dicot split have been noted, but 160 Mya is consistent with more recent molecular studies on the early Cretaceous lineages of monocots (K. Bremer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 4707 (2000)). Gray bars indicate confidence (95%) intervals.

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