Supporting Online Material


The Transmissibility and Control of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus
Yang Yang, Jonathan D. Sugimoto, M. Elizabeth Halloran, Nicole E. Basta, Dennis L. Chao, Laura Matrajt, Gail Potter, Eben Kenah, Ira M. Longini Jr.

Supporting Online Material

This supplement contains:
Materials and Methods
SOM Text
Figs. S1 to S13
Tables S1 to S14
References

This file is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.

Other Supporting Online Material for this manuscript includes the following: available at www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/1177373/DC1
Movies S1 and S2

Movie s1
No intervention vs 70% phased universal vaccination with a pandemic vaccine. Simulation of a single stochastic realization of pandemic influenza spread in the entire continental USA with R=1.6. In the top panel, there is no intervention. Infected people enter the USA at the major transportation hubs continuously starting on day 0. The virus is widespread throughout country by day 70 with the epidemic peaking on day 103. In the bottom panel, the population is vaccinated with a homologously matched vaccine, starting on day 30 and ending on day 135 when 70% of the population is covered. The epidemic is well-mitigated with spread equivalent to a mild seasonal influenza epidemic.

Movie s2
No intervention vs 70% phased child first vaccination with a pandemic vaccine. Simulation of a single stochastic realization of pandemic influenza spread in the entire continental USA with R=1.6. In the top panel, there is no intervention. Infected people enter the USA at the major transportation hubs continuously starting on day 0. The virus is widespread throughout country by day 70 with the epidemic peaking on day 103. In the bottom panel, the 70% of children are vaccinated with a homologously matched vaccine between days 30 and 61, as shown in Figure 5A, followed by 70% of adults being vaccinated between days 61 and 135. The epidemic is well-mitigated with little spread.

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