Supplementary Materials

Termite mounds can increase the robustness of dryland ecosystems to climatic change

Juan A. Bonachela, Robert M. Pringle, Efrat Sheffer, Tyler C. Coverdale, Jennifer A. Guyton, Kelly K. Caylor, Simon A. Levin, Corina E. Tarnita

Materials/Methods, Supplementary Text, Tables, Figures, and/or References

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  • Supplementary text
  • Figs. S1 to S8
  • Table S1
  • Full Reference List

Images, Video, and Other Other Media

Movie S1
Sequence of snapshots obtained with the modified model with one mound, stochastic rainfall rate, and parameterization as in Fig. 2. The red solid circle in the rainfall function panel represents the actual value of R(t), whereas the mean value is given by the brown curve. This movies shows the whole mound and surroundings (~20m lateral size). Note that, with this dynamic rainfall function, there is a realistic delay between the rainfall rate and the effects on the vegetation; thus, only well into the dry season the system loses most of its vegetation, which resists on the mound and as underground biomass. Once the rain season is well underway, vegetation is regenerated in the whole ecosystem, with patterns that change as water availability changes.
Movie S2
Sequence of snapshots obtained with the modified model with one mound, stochastic rainfall rate, and parameterization as in Fig. 2. The zoom is at 2m×2m, as in Fig. 2E. The red solid circle in the rainfall function panel represents the actual value of R(t), whereas the mean value is given by the brown curve. This movie shows a zoom of the area close to the mound boundaries.