Supplementary Materials

Jumping on water: Surface tension–dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects

Je-Sung Koh, Eunjin Yang, Gwang-Pil Jung, Sun-Pill Jung, Jae Hak Son, Sang-Im Lee, Piotr G. Jablonski, Robert J. Wood, Ho-Young Kim, Kyu-Jin Cho

Materials/Methods, Supplementary Text, Tables, Figures, and/or References

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  • Materials and Methods
  • Supplementary Text
  • Figs. S1 to S13
  • Tables S1 to S7

Images, Video, and Other Other Media

Movie S1
Movie clip of the robotic insect performing a smooth jump on the water surface without making a large splash. The movie plays at 0.005X real-time speed and was taken with a from high-speed camera recording at 3000 frames per second. The robot is prototype number 4, which satisfies the design criteria described in the paper.
Movie S2
Movie clip of a horizontal view of movie S1. The movie plays at 0.005X real-time speed and was taken with a high-speed camera recording at 3000 frames per second. Distortion of the water surface is shown, and the water surface supports the driving force of the legs successfully without breaking.
Movie S3
Movie clip of the robotic insect jumping on the rigid ground. The movie plays at 0.005X real-time speed and was taken with a high-speed camera recording at 3000 frames per second.
Movie S4
Movie clip showing robot prototype 4 jumping on water and on ground. The jumping heights in the two experiments are almost similar. The movie shows that the robot obtains almost the same momentum on water as on rigid ground. The movie plays at 1/8X real-time speed and was taken with a high-speed camera at 240 frames per second.
Movie S5
Movie clip showing water strider jumping on water in front view. The movie plays at 0.03X real-time speed. The water strider was placed in a square acrylic bath (70 mm wide) half-filled with water, and jumping behaviors were recorded from front view using a high-speed camera (TS 1000ME) at 1000 frames per second.