Supplementary Materials

Atom-by-atom assembly of defect-free one-dimensional cold atom arrays

Manuel Endres, Hannes Bernien, Alexander Keesling, Harry Levine, Eric R. Anschuetz, Alexandre Krajenbrink, Crystal Senko, Vladan Vuletic, Markus Greiner, Mikhail D. Lukin

Materials/Methods, Supplementary Text, Tables, Figures, and/or References

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  • Materials and Methods
  • Figs. S1 to S5
  • References

Images, Video, and Other Media

Movie S1
Rearrangement procedure. This video shows consecutive pairs of atom fluorescence images. Each pair consists of an initial image showing the random loading into the array of traps and a subsequent image after the loaded atoms have been rearranged to form a regular array. The sequence of images demonstrates the effectiveness of the procedure to reduce the entropy associated with the random initial positions of the atoms by ordering them in long, uninterrupted chains. The 1 Hz cycle rate in the video is slowed down by a factor of five relative to the 5 Hz experimental repetition rate.
Movie S2
Lifetime extension of 20 atom array. This video shows consecutive fluorescence images of atoms being rear-ranged from an initial probabilistic loading into an ordered array of 20 atoms and a reservoir formed by surplus atoms. The length of the target array is kept constant by transporting atoms from the reservoir to replace lost atoms in the target array. This technique makes it possible to extend the average lifetime of a defect-free 20 atom array to ≈ 8 s, at which point the reservoir typically has depleted. The 10 Hz frame rate of this video accurately reflects the rate at which these images were acquired.
Movie S3
Lifetime extension of 40 atom array. This video shows consecutive fluorescence images of atoms being rear- ranged from an initial probabilistic loading into an ordered array of 40 atoms and a reservoir formed by surplus atoms. The length of the target array is kept constant by transporting atoms from the reservoir to replace lost atoms in the target array. This technique makes it possible to extend the average lifetime of a defect-free 40 atom array to ≈ 2 s, at which point the reservoir typically has depleted. The 10 Hz frame rate of this video accurately reflects the rate at which these images were acquired.