Supplementary Materials

Second messenger–mediated tactile response by a bacterial rotary motor

Isabelle Hug, Siddharth Deshpande, Kathrin S. Sprecher, Thomas Pfohl, Urs Jenal

Materials/Methods, Supplementary Text, Tables, Figures, and/or References

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  • Materials and Methods 
  • Figures S1 to S7 
  • References 
Tables S1 to S4

Images, Video, and Other Media

Movie S1
C. crescentus cell division in a microfluidic flow channel. Holdfast is visualized using fluorescent WGA lectin. Note that in this representative example, a holdfast structure is visible at the flagellated pole of the SW progeny before separation from its mother cell.
Movie S2
High speed imaging of a representative SW cell that fails to attach to the surface after separating from its mother in a microfluidic flow channel. Note that SW cells that initiate rotation before separating from their mother generally do not attach.
Movie S3
High speed imaging of a representative SW cell that attaches to the surface after separating from its mother in a microfluidic flow channel. Note that SW cells that remain paralyzed before separating from their mother generally attach immediately downstream of their mother.
Movie S4
High speed imaging of a representative SW cell that attaches to the surface after separating from its mother in a microfluidic flow channel. Note that this SW cell stops rotation before separating from its mother and remains surface attached.
Movie S5
Cycles of growth and division in a microfluidic flow channel result in the formation of microcolonies from single founder cells
Movie S6
Time lapse of a dividing C. crescentus cell grown in a microfluidic flow channel that expressed a DgcB-Venus fusion. Note that DgcB localizes to the flagellated cell pole before and after cell division.